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NASA astronauts on board the ISS will enjoy crab bisque and roast turkey for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving in SPACE! Astronauts on board the ISS will enjoy crab bisque, roast turkey and blueberry cobbler today, NASA reveals

  • NASA has posted a video to its Twitter page about Thanksgiving on the ISS
  • Astronauts will enjoy crab bisque, roast turkey, candied yams and cobbler
  • And unlike here on Earth, where the Thanksgiving dinner can be a stressful process to cook, all the astronauts have to do is add hot water


From their position on the International Space Station, roughly 250 miles above the Earth, NASA astronauts are likely to feel pretty far from home this Thanksgiving.

But despite being so far away, NASA has revealed that its astronauts will be dining like kings today.

On the menu are crab bisque, roast turkey and blueberry cobbler, the astronauts revealed in a new video posted to NASA’s Twitter page.

And unlike here on Earth where the Thanksgiving dinner can be a stressful process to cook, all the astronauts have to do is add hot water.

Kayla Barron, one of the NASA astronauts currently on board the ISS joked: ‘Luckily, it doesn’t take as long to cook in space as most of it’s just being reheated!’

On the menu are crab bisque, roast turkey and blueberry cobbler, the astronauts revealed in a new video posted to NASA’s Twitter page

Salt and pepper come as liquids on the ISS 

While salt and pepper are available on the ISS, these only come in liquid form.

‘Astronauts can’t sprinkle salt and pepper on their food in space. The salt and pepper would simply float away.’ NASA explained.

‘There is a danger they could clog air vents, contaminate equipment or get stuck in an astronaut’s eyes, mouth or nose.’

NASA posted the video to its Twitter page, writing: ‘How do NASA astronauts spend Thanksgiving in space?

‘A little friendship, a little time on the treadmill – and, of course, roast turkey.’

Ms Barron, who has only been on the ISS for two weeks, revealed that the crew will be working on Thanksgiving, before enjoying a delicious team meal.

‘I think we’ll be working, but also looking forward to an awesome meal together,’ she said. 

And while Thanksgiving is traditionally only celebrated in the US, Ms Barron added that she and her NASA crewmembers – Raja Chari, Thomas Marshburn and Mark Vande Hei – will invite the international crew – Russian cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov and Pyotr Dubrovto and European Space Agency astronaut Matthias Maurer – to their Thanksgiving feast. 

‘I’m sure we’ll invite our cosmonaut colleagues to join us – it will be a very international Thanksgiving,’ she added.

Foods on the Thanksgiving menu include crab bisque, roast turkey, potatoes au gratin and candied yams, followed by blueberry cobbler.

Astronaut Tom Marshburn added: ‘The food is actually fantastic up here and we’re very much looking forward to some special things that have been sent for us.’

From their position on the International Space Station, 250 miles above the Earth, NASA astronauts are likely to feel pretty far from home this Thanksgiving. But despite being so far away, NASA has revealed that its astronauts will be dining like kings today

From their position on the International Space Station, 250 miles above the Earth, NASA astronauts are likely to feel pretty far from home this Thanksgiving. But despite being so far away, NASA has revealed that its astronauts will be dining like kings today

The preparation of meals in space varies depending on the type of food, according to NASA.

‘Some foods can be eaten in their natural forms, such as brownies and fruit,’ it explained. ‘Other foods require adding water, such as macaroni and cheese or spaghetti.

‘Of course, an oven is provided in the space station to heat foods to the proper temperature.

‘There are no refrigerators in space, so space food must be stored and prepared properly to avoid spoilage, especially on longer missions.’

And while salt and pepper are available, these only come in liquid form.

‘Astronauts can’t sprinkle salt and pepper on their food in space. The salt and pepper would simply float away.’ NASA explained.

‘There is a danger they could clog air vents, contaminate equipment or get stuck in an astronaut’s eyes, mouth or nose.’ 

EXPLAINED: THE $100 BILLION INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION SITS 250 MILES ABOVE THE EARTH

The International Space Station (ISS) is a $100 billion (£80 billion) science and engineering laboratory that orbits 250 miles (400 km) above Earth.

It has been permanently staffed by rotating crews of astronauts and cosmonauts since November 2000. 

Crews have come mainly from the US and Russia, but the Japanese space agency JAXA and European space agency ESA have also sent astronauts. 

The International Space Station has been continuously occupied for more than 20 years and has been expended with multiple new modules added and upgrades to systems

The International Space Station has been continuously occupied for more than 20 years and has been expended with multiple new modules added and upgrades to systems 

Research conducted aboard the ISS often requires one or more of the unusual conditions present in low Earth orbit, such as low-gravity or oxygen.

ISS studies have investigated human research, space medicine, life sciences, physical sciences, astronomy and meteorology.

The US space agency, NASA, spends about $3 billion (£2.4 billion) a year on the space station program, with the remaining funding coming from international partners, including Europe, Russia and Japan.

So far 244 individuals from 19 countries have visited the station, and among them eight private citizens who spent up to $50 million for their visit.

There is an ongoing debate about the future of the station beyond 2025, when it is thought some of the original structure will reach ‘end of life’.

Russia, a major partner in the station, plans to launch its own orbital platform around then, with Axiom Space, a private firm, planning to send its own modules for purely commercial use to the station at the same time. 

NASA, ESA, JAXA and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) are working together to build a space station in orbit around the moon, and Russia and China are working on a similar project, that would also include a base on the surface. 

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