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NASA photos show rich history of astronauts snapping themselves hundreds of miles above the Earth

Selfies in space! NASA photos show the rich history of astronauts snapping themselves out on spacewalks hundreds of miles above the Earth

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No amount of selfies will ever come close to the stunning ones these intrepid space explorers capture. Ever since NASA’s Buzz Aldrin took the first ever selfie in space in 1966, astronauts photographing themselves on spacewalks hundreds of miles above the Earth has become a rich tradition. Scroll through to see these amazing photographs that capture the harmonious mix of humans’ technological sophistication and the natural beauty of space…

Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency flight engineer Akihiko Hoshide takes a selfie with a digital still camera during a six-and-a-half hour spacewalk for repair work on September 5, 2012 - three months into the 32nd long-duration expedition to the satellite. The Earth and the International Space Station (ISS) can be seen reflected in Hoshide's helmet visor, along with fellow astronaut Sunita Williams of NASA, while the Sun shines brightly over his right shoulder.

Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency flight engineer Akihiko Hoshide takes a selfie with a digital still camera during a six-and-a-half hour spacewalk for repair work on September 5, 2012 – three months into the 32nd long-duration expedition to the satellite. The Earth and the International Space Station (ISS) can be seen reflected in Hoshide’s helmet visor, along with fellow astronaut Sunita Williams of NASA, while the Sun shines brightly over his right shoulder.

NASA's Anne McClain, grinning broadly with her visor up, floats 260 miles above the surface of the Earth during an excursion to upgrade the power storage capacity of the ISS on March 22, 2019. This was McClain's first spacewalk.

NASA’s Anne McClain, grinning broadly with her visor up, floats 260 miles above the surface of the Earth during an excursion to upgrade the power storage capacity of the ISS on March 22, 2019. This was McClain’s first spacewalk.

During the 59th ISS excursion on June 14, 2018, NASA's Nick Hague captures the Earth's reflection in his visor from one of the space station's port-side support structures.

During the 59th ISS excursion on June 14, 2018, NASA’s Nick Hague captures the Earth’s reflection in his visor from one of the space station’s port-side support structures.

Chris Cassidy of NASA snaps a selfie with a digital camera on July 16, 2013, before his spacewalk was cut short after barely more than an hour. Fellow astronaut Luca Parmitano (who is out of the frame) had reported water floating behind his head within his helmet. Although the water presented no immediate risk, Mission Control elected to end the EVA early.

Chris Cassidy of NASA snaps a selfie with a digital camera on July 16, 2013, before his spacewalk was cut short after barely more than an hour. Fellow astronaut Luca Parmitano (who is out of the frame) had reported water floating behind his head within his helmet. Although the water presented no immediate risk, Mission Control elected to end the EVA early.

Ricky Arnold is pictured here on June 14, 2018. This spacewalk's purpose was to install high definition cameras to better track commercial crew spacecraft - such as the Boeing Starliner and the SpaceX Crew Dragon - as they come in to dock with the ISS.

Ricky Arnold is pictured here on June 14, 2018. This spacewalk’s purpose was to install high definition cameras to better track commercial crew spacecraft – such as the Boeing Starliner and the SpaceX Crew Dragon – as they come in to dock with the ISS.

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly on December 21, 2015. Together with colleague Tim Kopra, Kelly release the brake handles on the crew equipment carts on the sides of the ISS’s mobile transporter rail car so that it could be secured prior to the docking of a Russian spacecraft bringing cargo supplies up into orbit.

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly on December 21, 2015. Together with colleague Tim Kopra, Kelly release the brake handles on the crew equipment carts on the sides of the ISS’s mobile transporter rail car so that it could be secured prior to the docking of a Russian spacecraft bringing cargo supplies up into orbit.

NASA's Ricky Arnold poses for a selfie on March 29, 2018.

NASA’s Ricky Arnold poses for a selfie on March 29, 2018. 

Mark Vande Hei of NASA takes a self-portrait on January 23, 2018, during an excursion to repair one of the ISS's robotic arms.

Mark Vande Hei of NASA takes a self-portrait on January 23, 2018, during an excursion to repair one of the ISS’s robotic arms.

NASA's Ricky Arnold poses for a selfie during an EVA to install wireless communications antennas onto the outside of the ISS's Tranquillity module on March 29, 2018.

NASA’s Ricky Arnold poses for a selfie during an EVA to install wireless communications antennas onto the outside of the ISS’s Tranquillity module on March 29, 2018.

Mark Vande Hei, pictured here with his visor down, captures the Earth and the ISS in another selfie taken on January 23, 2018.

Mark Vande Hei, pictured here with his visor down, captures the Earth and the ISS in another selfie taken on January 23, 2018.

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins during an EVA on August 19, 2016 to install an international docking adaptor onto the ISS. The adaptor allows commercial spacecraft from Boeing and SpaceX to dock with the orbiting station.

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins during an EVA on August 19, 2016 to install an international docking adaptor onto the ISS. The adaptor allows commercial spacecraft from Boeing and SpaceX to dock with the orbiting station.

European Space Agency Astronaut Luca Parmitano takes a quick selfie break during work to perform minor installations on the ISS's backbone and prepare the station for the impending addition of a new Russian module.

European Space Agency Astronaut Luca Parmitano takes a quick selfie break during work to perform minor installations on the ISS’s backbone and prepare the station for the impending addition of a new Russian module.

NASA's Sunita Williams captures one of the ISS's 122-foot (37-meter) -long solar power arrays in her reflective helmet visor.

NASA’s Sunita Williams captures one of the ISS’s 122-foot (37-meter) -long solar power arrays in her reflective helmet visor.

NASA Astronaut Mike Fossum poses for a snap during a near-seven-hour spacewalk to prepare the core pressurized section of the Japanese science module 'Kibo' for attachment to the ISS on June 3, 2008.

NASA Astronaut Mike Fossum poses for a snap during a near-seven-hour spacewalk to prepare the core pressurized section of the Japanese science module ‘Kibo’ for attachment to the ISS on June 3, 2008.

The first ever space selfie was taken by NASA astronaut Buzz Aldrin while doing EVA outside of the Gemini 12 spacecraft on November 12, 1966. In proving that astronauts can effectively work in space, the Gemini program helped pave the way for the Apollo program to famously put Aldrin and Neil Armstrong on the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969.

The first ever space selfie was taken by NASA astronaut Buzz Aldrin while doing EVA outside of the Gemini 12 spacecraft on November 12, 1966. In proving that astronauts can effectively work in space, the Gemini program helped pave the way for the Apollo program to famously put Aldrin and Neil Armstrong on the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969.

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